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Main Findings of Our Article


More about this image

More about this image

  • Tight Coupling between Temperature and Vegetation Seasonality
    • Station thermometer data and satellite measurements of vegetation greenness show a strong linear relationship between temperature seasonality and vegetation seasonality over the past 30 years (1982 to 2011). More Info.
  • Large Diminishment of Temperature Seasonality
    • Temperature seasonality of the Northern lands has diminished in the past 30 years by an amount equivalent to a 4 to 5 degree southward shift in latitude.
    • The best estimate from 17 state-of-the-art climate models is an additional diminishment of about 18 degrees southward shift in latitude by the end of 21st century.
    • More info.
  • Large Diminishment of Vegetation Seasonality
    • Consequently, vegetation seasonality in the Northern lands has diminished in the past 30 years by an amount equivalent to a 6 to 7 degree southward shift in latitude. More info.
  • Increased Plant Growth in the North
    • Diminishment of northern vegetation seasonality means increase in plant growth. We find that plant growth in the North increased by 7 to 10 percent over the past 30 years. This increase is seen in more than one-third of the northern vegetated lands. More info.
    • Photographic evidence.
  • Uncertain Future
    • The tight coupling between temperature and vegetation seasonality hides the fact that vegetation seasonality in the Arctic is accelerating over time (landscape greening rate increasing over time) and decelerating (greening rate slowing down over time) in the Boreal regions.
    • Therefore, we do not know how vegetation seasonality (i.e. plant growth, species distribution) will change in the future.
    • More info.
Climate and Vegetation Research Group
Dept. of Geography,Boston University. XXX-XX-2013